Steam Locomotive Railroad Train Engine

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    The General is a type 4-4-0 steam locomotive that was the subject of the Great Locomotive Chase of the American Civil W

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    Comes in multiple polygon counts with one purchase...
    High poly count: 135747
    Medium poly count: 68432
    Low poly count: 6638
    Very low poly count: 1114

    The General is a type 4-4-0 steam locomotive that was the subject of the Great Locomotive Chase of the American Civil War. The locomotive is preserved at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History in Kennesaw, Georgia, and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    Built in 1855 by Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor in Paterson, New Jersey, The General provided freight and passenger service between Atlanta, Georgia, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, before the Civil War on the Western and Atlantic Railroad. The General was built by the firm of Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor of Paterson, N.J., for the Western & Atlantic Railroad at a cost of $8,850.
    Her construction number is 631, and she was completed in December 1855. She was built as an eight wheel, wood-burning locomotive of the American type, with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement, weighing about 50,300 pounds, with a gauge of five feet and cylinders 15 inches in diameter and a stroke of 22 inches. The four driving wheels, each 60 inches in diameter, were made of cast iron. The weight on the drivers is 32,000 pounds, and the weight on the leading truck wheels is 18,000 pounds. The boiler was a type known as Wagon Top and was covered with felt and Russia iron. The engine carried a working steam pressure of 140 pounds. The boiler contains 130 flues each eleven feet long and two inches in diameter. The leading truck, with four wheels, was built with a rigid center. The tender has two trucks of four wheels each, 30 inches in diameter and with inside bearings. The smoke stack of the old engine was of the balloon type known as a Radley and Hunter stack, designed for burning wood as fuel. The engine had no live steam injectors but instead took water from the tender by a pair of ram type pumps which were activated by the crossheads. Therefore, the boiler could not be supplied with water unless the engine was moving. There was no brake on the engine, and the hand brake on the tender was probably used when the engine was idle during terminal layovers. The way to stop the engine was for the engineer to pull back on the Johnson reverse bar and put the engine in reverse. Such a feature is unheard of today and has been for years.
    The General was built by the firm of Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor of Paterson, N.J., for the Western & Atlantic Railroad at a cost of $8,850.

    Her construction number is 631, and she was completed in December 1855. She was built as an eight wheel, wood-burning locomotive of the American type, with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement, weighing about 50,300 pounds, with a gauge of five feet and cylinders 15 inches in diameter and a stroke of 22 inches. The four driving wheels, each 60 inches in diameter, were made of cast iron. The weight on the drivers is 32,000 pounds, and the weight on the leading truck wheels is 18,000 pounds. The boiler was a type known as Wagon Top and was covered with felt and Russia iron. The engine carried a working steam pressure of 140 pounds. The boiler contains 130 flues each eleven feet long and two inches in diameter. The leading truck, with four wheels, was built with a rigid center. The tender has two trucks of four wheels each, 30 inches in diameter and with inside bearings. The smoke stack of the old engine was of the balloon type known as a Radley and Hunter stack, designed for burning wood as fuel. The engine had no live steam injectors but instead took water from the tender by a pair of ram type pumps which were activated by the crossheads. Therefore, the boiler could not be supplied with water unless the engine was moving. There was no brake on the engine, and the hand brake on the tender was probably used when the engine was idle during terminal layovers. The way to stop the engine was for the engineer to pull back on the Johnson reverse bar and put the engine in reverse. Such a feature is unheard of today and has been for years.

    When the General was ready for shipment from the Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor plant, she was placed on a heavy flat car and drawn by mules along Market Street in Paterson to the tracks of the Erie Railroad a mile away. The Rogers plant and its successors built over 6,000 steam locomotives, and the company always worked under the handicap of being far away from a main railroad track. The General was moved over the rails of the Erie Railroad to Philadelphia where she was loaded aboard a sailing ship for the thousand mile journey to Savannah. There she was placed on the rails of the Central Railroad of Georgia for the 191-mile run to Macon and then the 103-mile run to Atlanta over the rails of the Macon & Western Railroad.

    The Annual Report of the W&A RR for 1856 reflects the fact that the General was placed in service on the Road in January 1856 for use in freight service. With five foot driving wheels, the General was equally capable of handling passenger trains.

    Soon after the General arrived on the W&ARR, she was moved to the State Road Shops in Atlanta where the distinctive strap iron pilot was installed. All W&ARR locomotives were equipped with pilots of this type. This new pilot was made by Tom Haney, blacksmith in the Shops and father of young Henry Haney who later performed so well as fireman for Pete Bracken on the Texas during The Great Locomotive Chase.


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